Forensics Team Wins Conference

For+winning+the+conference+meet%2C+the+forensics+team+earned+a+plaque+to+display+in+the+forensics+team%27s+display+case+in+the+academic+wing.

Photo submitted by Mrs. Samantha Meyers

For winning the conference meet, the forensics team earned a plaque to display in the forensics team's display case in the academic wing.

Karin Juhl and Claudia Brown

The CHS forensics team came in first out of seven teams at this year’s Eastern Wisconsin Conference forensics meet, the first time Chilton has won since 2010. The conference meet was held at CHS on February 10.

Forensics participants prepare a speech, reading or acting piece. At a competition, they perform their forensics piece in one, two or three rounds for different judges. The conference meet is two rounds.

Entries are judged out of 25 points according to a rubric specific to their category, and the scores from each round are added up for the entry’s final score.

The team’s overall score is an average of all the students’ final scores. Chilton had an average score of 42.769 out of 50 points.

There are a total of twenty-two students on the team this year, with fourteen entries in total.

“This team, even though it is larger than normal, has the talent for forensics,” said Mrs. Samantha Meyers, the team’s head coach. “Those returning have a real dedication to the team, and new additions have a skill for acting and public speaking, which really helps in the long run.”

Emilee-Elizabeth Maney in Farrago and the Play Acting group of Hayden Bailey, Ellie Fuerbringer, Cortney Piepenburg, Sara Ray and Christian Siech were the top scorers for Chilton. Both entries scored a total of 48 out of a possible 50 points between the two rounds.

“As a senior, it was nice to participate in my last conference meet and to finally come away as champs,” Maney said.

Chilton has three forensics coaches. Mrs. Meyers teaches English and has coached forensics for eight years. Band teacher Ms. Michelle Kochan has coached for three years, and this year is social studies teacher Mrs. Emily Guy’s first year coaching.

Forensics judges are generally the teams’ coaches. Each team needs to bring a judge for every five entries, and if the team doesn’t have enough coaches, they must hire a judge. People must go through adjudicator training to be a forensics judge.

The team’s subdistrict meet, which is three rounds, was held at Two Rivers on February 24.